Dark Matter and Energy: New Theory Might Explain The Missing 95 Percent Of The Universe

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University of Oxford researchers came up with a new scientific study in which they unified dark matter and dark energy into one phenomenon, namely, a fluid of “negative mass.” Until now, LambdaCDM, the current model for the Universe that scientists widely accepted, is not telling us anything about dark matter and energy. We only know some about them because of the gravitational pull they exert on the observable matter.

In a new study published today in Astronomy and Astrophysics, scientists at the University of Oxford came up with a new model for the Universe, shedding more light on both dark matter and dark energy.

“We now think that both dark matter and dark energy can be unified into a fluid which possesses a type of ‘negative gravity,” repelling all other material around them. Although this matter is peculiar to us, it suggests that our cosmos is symmetrical in both positive and negative qualities,” explained Dr. Jamie Farnes, the study’s leading author.

New Theory Unifies Dark Matter and Energy To Explain The Missing 95 Percent Of The Universe

Previously, scientists ruled out the existence of matter with negative mass as they believed it was going to become less dense as our Universe expands. However, recent observations concluded that dark matter is not fading away in the Universe as the time passes by, but, on the contrary, it is increasingly more. In their new theory, the researchers found out that dark matter and dark energy are working together and, united, they create a fluid of negative mass that is not diluting over time due to the expansion of the Universe.

“Previous approaches to combining dark energy and dark matter have attempted to modify Einstein’s theory of general relativity, which has turned out to be incredibly challenging. This new approach takes two old ideas that are known to be compatible with Einstein’s theory—negative masses and matter creation—and combines them together. The outcome seems rather beautiful: dark energy and dark matter can be unified into a single substance, with both effects being simply explainable as positive mass matter surfing on a sea of negative masses,” explained Dr. Farnes.

“There are still many theoretical issues, and computational simulations to work through, and LambdaCDM has a nearly 30-year head start, but I’m looking forward to seeing whether this new extended version of LambdaCDM can accurately match other observational evidence of our cosmology. If real, it would suggest that the missing 95 percent of the Universe had an aesthetic solution – we had forgotten to include a simple minus sign,” concluded Farnes.


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