Scientists Think About Moving The Earth To A New Orbit To Escape Annihilation

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In most science-fiction novels and movies, the threat faced by Earth is mitigated without the need to move the planet from its current position. A scenario which would require such a feat seems to be quite impossible, but a fundamental question will surface: could we move the Earth if there was no other way escape annihilation?

It is already known that at one point in the future the Sun will consume all its fuel. After that stage is reached, the star will begin to grow, and it could consume our planet during this expansion. This scenario may seem to be one of the most feasible ones, but it is likely that humanity will reach many planets before our solar system reaches that stage.

The most common threat is posed by large meteors, asteroids, and comets which have the potential to hit our planet with an incredible force, on par with one of hundreds or even millions of nuclear warheads detonated at the same time. The consequences of such an impact could be quite dire as the volcanic eruption on a considerably smaller scale can wreak havoc across the world.

Scientists Think About Moving The Earth To A New Orbit To Escape Annihilation

Space agencies from all over the world are working on potential solutions which could mitigate or eliminate such threats without collateral damage. A strategic nuclear strike could force an object to change its current path. The same effect could be achieved with the help of a kinetic impactor, which is a large ship that could hit the object and lead it on another trajectory.

Some researchers are working on methods which may allow us to move the planet out of harm’s way. One project involves the use of an oversized electric thruster which could harness the power of the sun to emit an intense ion beam. The Breakthrough Starshot project suggests the use of a high power laser beam.

As expected, the development and use of an efficient solution to move the Earth to a new orbit to escape annihilation is considerably challenging, but a practical solution may surface in the future.


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