The Large Hadron Collider Shuts Down Until 2021

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The particle accelerator which became notorious for the evidence it brought on the existence of the Higgs Boson particle, the so-called God Particle, The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) shuts down. Different from the situation of 2016 when the LHC was put in hibernation mode because of a weasel which chewed some of the accelerator’s wires, the recent operation was on purpose.

The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) scientists shut down The Large Hadron Collider for maintenance and to implement a couple of upgrades to enhance the performance of the LHC particle accelerator. These two processes would only take a little more than one year so that the renowned particle accelerator would come back online in 2021.

According to a CERN press release, the next set of experiments would involve collisions at higher energy levels than the previous ones, so the particle accelerator needs an upgrade. The researchers need to replace the two accelerators in the LHC to produce collisions at higher energy levels.

The Large Hadron Collider Shuts Down Until 2021

“The second run of the LHC has been impressive, as we could deliver well beyond our objectives and expectations, producing five times more data than during the first run, at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV. With this second long shutdown starting now, we will prepare the machine for even more collisions at the design energy of 14 TeV,” explained Frederick Bordry, Director for Accelerators and Technology at CERN.

By colliding particles at higher energy levels, CERN scientists plan to conduct new experiments that, at the moment, are impossible with the current LHC configuration.

“The rich harvest of the second run enables the researchers to look for very rare processes. They will be busy throughout the shutdown examining the huge data sample for possible signatures of new physics that haven’t had the chance to emerge from the dominant contribution of the Standard Model processes. That will guide us into the HL-LHC when the data sample increases by yet another order of magnitude,” also explained the Director for Research and Computing at CERN, Eckhard Elsen.

Vadim Ioan Caraiman

With over seven years of experience in online journalism, Vadim is passionate about everything related to science and the environment. For us, he will thus cover climate, environment, and science news, among others.


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