New Methods To More Effectively Produce Brain Stem Cells Developed By Scientists

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A scientific team at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine filed two study papers on the finding and integration of new methods to more effectively produce brain stem cells developed by scientists. The recent discovery shed more light on the underlying mechanisms of neurological disorders. The study was published in the Nature Communications and Stem Cell Reports journals.

“Making these specialized brain stem cells on a large scale at high purity from pluripotent stem cells gives us a powerful tool to study previously inaccessible normal and diseased tissues in the central nervous system. We applied our technology to genetic models of myelin disease, which resulted in the discovery of a chemical compound that helps diseased myelin-producing cells to survive,” said the studies’ leading author, Paul Tesar, Ph.D., who worked along with Dr. Donald and Ruth Weber Goodman from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

New Methods To More Effectively Produce Brain Stem Cells Developed By Scientists

According to the study published in the Nature Communications journal, the scientists came up with a current methodology to produce massive volumes of oligodendrocytes and their progenitor cells, the so-called progenitor cells or OPCs. On the other hand, the researchers of the second research issued in the Stem Cell Reports journal raised OPC-producing technology to offer new insights and therapeutic methods for a lethal genetic disorder regarding myelin, the well-known Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease (PMD).

The researchers discovered that PMD-affected cells went through an unexpectedly early critical phase featuring endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death. To tackle this issue, the doctors tested dozens of medicines and discovered that one called Ro 25-6981 was successful.

“Our work is an important first step of a multi-phase process. We have achieved survival of oligodendrocytes which normally die in the disease. The next step is to figure out how to coax these cells to efficiently myelinate and restore function to patients,” said Paul Tesar.

Erin VanDyke lives on her family farm and has more than 35 years of hands-on experience with the use of livestock guard dogs for predator control. On their farm, Jan and her family use corgis as herding dogs and have raised Shetland sheep, Fainting goats, Morgan and Trakehner horses, and historic breeds of chickens and turkeys. Erin is also an active beekeeper.


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