China’s Fusion Reactor Got Hotter Than The Sun In A New Chinese Breakthrough

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Researchers of China’s fusion reactor, known as the “Chinese artificial Sun,” claimed they made another breakthrough as the fusion reactor reached temperatures of 180 million degrees Fahrenheit with a heating power of 10 megawatts, as reported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. That’s hotter than the Sun, in reality. More specifically, the “Chinese artificial Sun” achieved a temperature by six times higher than that of the core of our host star.

The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), as the device is known, is designed to make use of the nuclear fusion process, the same energy that powers the stars in the Universe.

In a fusion reaction, two atomic nuclei merge due to extremely high pressure, reaching a top temperature of 270 million degrees Fahrenheit. Once the cores unite, they generate energy that can be captured and used. Besides, this type of power is 100 percent eco-friendly as there are no carbon emissions, while it’s also safer than nuclear fission.

China’s Fusion Reactor Got Hotter Than The Sun In A New Chinese Breakthrough

“The news from EAST is very exciting,” said William Dorland from the University of Maryland for Digital Trends. However, even though the result is not unique, Dorland said the result is exhilarating, primarily because of the design of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) device, as it is constructed for “magnetic confinement fusion.”

“The challenge for magnetic confinement fusion is to produce high temperatures in the fuel while also maintaining high density and excellent thermal insulation. Achieving these three performance goals simultaneously is seriously hard,” added Dorland for Digital Trends.

“This is the ‘SpaceX moment’ for fusion. It’s the moment when the maturation of fusion science is combined with the emergence of 21st Century enabling technologies like additive manufacturing and high-temperature superconductors. Fusion is no longer ’30 years away,'” also said the chief executive of the Canadian company General Fusion, Christofer Mowry, for the BBC.


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