Black Holes Can Be Employed As A Particle Accelerator

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Since the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has discovered the Higgs boson, the scientists started wondering what’s next. While, at the moment, the LHC is the most potent particle collider in the world, boasting collisions at energies that can reach 13 TeV, physicists plan to create an even more massive particle accelerator. But that can be costly to develop and operate, so a team of scientists from the University of Amsterdam, the South American Institute for Fundamental Research, and Cambridge University imagined using black holes as a particle accelerator.

Scientists have already observed the gravitational waves produced by black holes merger and neutron stars collision. However, we can only “see” those events with reduced accuracy. By increasing the sensitivity of the observations, astronomers may be able to notice other energy fluctuations and measure them.

Through a process that’s known as “frame dragging” black holes give energy to the surrounding matter. When a cloud of materials would happen to exist next to a black hole when it would merge with a second one, that significant amounts of energy would be transferred from the black holes merger to the matter in the cloud.

Black Holes Can Be Employed As A Particle Accelerator

That energy transfer might result in the creation of exotic particles and a beam of particles that we could never ever see here, on Earth, no matter how potent would a human-made particle collider be. However, nobody can see those particles directly, but scientists can study and measure them since they will affect the gravitational waves generated by the black holes merger.

“We study the gravitational-wave signatures of clouds of ultralight bosons around black holes in binary inspirals. These clouds, which are formed via superradiance instabilities for rapidly rotating black holes, produce distinct effects and a continuous monochromatic gravitational-wave signal,” the scientists wrote in their study report.

“We show that the presence of a binary companion greatly enriches the dynamical evolution of the system, most remarkably through the existence of resonant transitions between the growing and decaying modes of the [cloud of matter]. The observation of these effects would constrain the properties of putative ultralight bosons through precision gravitational-wave data, offering new probes of physics beyond the Standard Model,” the scientists added.


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