Anti-Global Warming Atmospheric Spraying Might Be Effective, But Too Costly With Current Technology

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The scientists are working on developing a program to reduce Earth’s heat capture by throwing aerosols into the atmosphere. However, this anti-global warming atmospheric spraying project might be effective against temperature increase worldwide, but it’s too costly with current technology. Those are the conclusions of recent research released in Environmental Research Letters, and which focused on the effectiveness and costs of several methods for delivering sulfates into the lower stratosphere, which are known as the Stratospheric Aerosol Injection (SAI).

“While we don’t make any judgment about the desirability of SAI, we do show that a hypothetical deployment program is starting 15 years from now, while both highly uncertain and ambitious, would be technically possible strictly from an engineering perspective. It would also be remarkably inexpensive, at an average of around $2 to 2.5 billion per year over the first 15 years,” said Dr. Gernot Wagner from the Harvard University’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Anti-Global Warming Atmospheric Spraying Might Be Effective, But Too Costly With Current Technology

“I became intrigued by the engineering questions around SAI and the many studies that purport to show that modified existing planes could do the job. Turns out that is not so. It would indeed take an entirely new plane design to do SAI under reasonable albeit entirely hypothetical parameters. No existing aircraft has the combination of altitude and payload capabilities required,” said Wake Smith CEO of Pemco World Air Services, COO of Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings, and President of the Training Division at Boeing.

“Given the potential benefits of halving average projected increases in radiative forcing from a particular date onward, these numbers invoke the ‘incredible economics’ of solar geoengineering. Dozens of countries could fund such a program, and the required technology is not particularly exotic,” added Dr. Gernot Wagner.

In conclusion, the scientists said that such an anti-global warming atmospheric spraying program might be effective, but, with the current technology, such a project would also be too costly.

Vadim Ioan Caraiman

With over seven years of experience in online journalism, Vadim is passionate about everything related to science and the environment. For us, he will thus cover climate, environment, and science news, among others.


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