Reduced Electronic Usage will Keep your Kids Healthier

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A recently published study has revealed that kids which spend more than two hours in front of a screen show signs of decreased cognitive abilities. This those not come as a surprise, as previous research already suggests that the advent of touchscreen devices has negative effects on the younger populates.

The study took place in the U.S, where children from 20 schools received cognition tests that aimed to measure their abilities. The age of the kids ranged been eight and eleven, and their answered questionnaires about their sleep, physical activity done inside and outside school grounds, and how much time they spend in front of the T.V.  The results showed a dangerous trend.

Most of the kids spent more than two hours with an electronic device (with two hours being the recommended safe limit). More than 50% skipped on the recommended amount of sleep, (ranging between nine and eleven hours per night), and only 18% exercise for one hour per day. Only %% of all the kids met all the three requirements while 30% didn’t meet any of the criteria.

Most of the ids also enjoyed extra screen time, as the average time was around 3.6 hours. A surprising detail is the fact that children which only met the physical activity requirements do not show a better cognition level, although sport is usually thought as an activity which strengthens cognitive functions.

Researchers kept in mind other factors that may have influenced the results such as the net household income, race and ethnicity, the body max index and other useful indicators, but they cannot claim that the study is completely accurate.

The theory that prolonged screen time may affect cognition has been backed-up by several studies, and it has been explain that each minute of screen time reduces the time available for physical activity, which would benefit the child more.

Further studies are already focusing on the impact of screen time on the young people, and more results will be soon published.

Karen and her husband live on a plot of land in British Columbia. They aim to grow and raise a significant part of their food by maintaining a vegetable garden, keeping a flock of backyard chickens and foraging. They are also currently planning a move to a small cabin they hand built. Karen’s academic background in nutrition made her care deeply about real food and seek ways to obtain it. Thus sprung Anna’s interest in backyard gardening, chicken and goat keeping, recycling and self-sufficiency.


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