History of Antibiotics Explored During a New Study

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A new study has uncovered fascinating details about the evolution of antibiotics and the resistance to them. It seems that they emerged together up to 500 million years ago.

This is the first paper which explores the biosynthesis of antibiotics and resistance while also taking into account the evolutionary progress. Data gathered during the study could be harnessed for the production of new medicine and antibiotic alternatives, which may become mandatory as antimicrobial resistance continues to rise across the world.

During an interviewed, one of the leading researchers who contributed to the study stated that the researchers had identified new approaches related to the use of antibiotics and the creations of new drugs which could combat antimicrobial infections. In the early stages, the team strived to track down genome sequences which contained relevant data.

History of Antibiotics Explored During a New Study

The researchers observed that the precursors of the genes which generate antibiotics appeared almost one billion years ago Genetic data revealed a connection between the production of glycopeptide antibiotics in a group of bacteria which is known under the name of Actinobacteria.

Within the glycopeptide group, we can count vancomycin and teicoplanin, which play an essential role in the treatment of bacterial infections. However, resistance surfaced at a considerably later date when the initial versions of substances similar to vancomycin began to appear almost 350 to 500 million years ago. Information collected during the study will enhance the work of other scientists who are investigating the antibiotic crisis.

In the past compounds were used by bacteria before many of the land creatures were present and resistance evolved as a self-defense mechanism for bacteria which produced the chemicals. As vancomycin became popular in modern medicine and agriculture, the resistance trait made the jump from harmless producers to dangerous bacteria at a speed which remains surprising. Further research is needed, but the current results are promising. The study was published in a medical journal.


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