The Red Spot from Jupiter is Getting Taller as it Shrinks

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The Red Spot from Jupiter has been studied by researchers for centuries. Most of the people don’t even know that it exists, because the storm can only be noticed if you have the right equipment, like NASA has. Attentive observation has reached to the conclusion that the storm’s size has been modifying for a century and a half. The conclusions were published these days and scientists say that this could be beginning of a new observing program.

What are the differences spotted in Jupiter’s storm size

Centuries ago the red spot from Jupiter was very big; it could integrate the Earth three times with enough room to spare. In the last century, Jupiter’s Great Red Spot has been shrinking and nobody knows what the tendency would be next; it could continue to shrink or it will disappear.

The differences in its’ size have been revealed recently. Although the red spot is getting smaller, it is continuing to grow taller. This activity is surprising and unpredictable. Scientists say that, because of the storm’s dynamic, they cannot predict what will happen next. The spot could change its’ shape and size, but it could also disappear.

Ever since the storm was observed, in 1831, the activity was deeply analyzed. Scientists have always followed it, so that they could see if it is a threat to Earth. They always said that the storm was no threat for our planet and the situation remains the same.

What will happen next

The latest information released by scientists show that the Great Red Spot has started to move towards the west with great speed. Although the storm remains at the same latitude, it could move in the next centuries.

The future is unclear. Scientists don’t know what to expect, but they are sure that the Red Spot will not become a danger for our planet. They will continue to watch the storm’s evolution and inform us when changes appear.

Erin VanDyke lives on her family farm and has more than 35 years of hands-on experience with the use of livestock guard dogs for predator control. On their farm, Jan and her family use corgis as herding dogs and have raised Shetland sheep, Fainting goats, Morgan and Trakehner horses, and historic breeds of chickens and turkeys. Erin is also an active beekeeper.


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