Scientists have Grown Vegetables in Antarctica

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You may have never thought it truly possible for one to grow vegetable in Antarctica, one of the world’s coldest and most unwelcoming place that there ever would be for plants to thrive. However, it looks like scientists have made one of their first breakthroughs in this department by growing said plants in a controlled environment.

How did that happen?

Well, the team of scientists managed to grow plants in crops that were not exposed to earth, to daylight or to pesticides and they managed to do this successfully. This experiment was part of a bigger project, one interested in helping astronauts grow plants on other planets, in environments that will more often than not be hostile towards them.

The team of researchers came from the Neumayer Station III and they decided to list out the plants that they managed to grow and the quantities. They were able to produce 3.6 kilograms of lettuce, salad greens if we wanted to be more exact, they grew 70 radishes and 18 cucumbers in those unforgiving conditions.

This took place in a specially built greenhouse as the temperatures outside were below freezing, at times dropping even below -20 degrees Celsius. This project was put together by the German Aerospace Center DLR. They stated that they are hoping to grow around 4 or 5 kilograms of vegetable and fruit on a weekly basis.

It is true that NASA has already succeeded in growing plants on the International Space Station but the main goal of the German Aerospace Center DLR is to be able to cultivate a wider range of fruits and vegetables than NASA was able to do so that these plants could be successfully grown on Mars or the Moon, if there are going to be colonies or space stations living there at any point in the future.

Karen and her husband live on a plot of land in British Columbia. They aim to grow and raise a significant part of their food by maintaining a vegetable garden, keeping a flock of backyard chickens and foraging. They are also currently planning a move to a small cabin they hand built. Karen’s academic background in nutrition made her care deeply about real food and seek ways to obtain it. Thus sprung Anna’s interest in backyard gardening, chicken and goat keeping, recycling and self-sufficiency.


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