Psilocybin Researchers Must Pay $7,000 To Study One Single Gram Of This Drug Which Is Supposed To Possess Therapeutic Benefits

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Medical research is expensive. And some research even more than others. Now, some US researchers have to pay between $7,000 and $10,000 dollars to study just one gram of psilocybin, the molecule causing the hallucinogenic effects of certain fungi. This is the price announced by Matthew Johnson, a psychiatrist and professor of behavioral sciences at the John Hopkins University, in Baltimore. The doctor has been conducting a long-term study on psilocybin for several years.

$7,000 per gram is about thirteen times more than the price paid by those who buy psilocybin mushrooms on the black market.

So, why such a big gap?

Because of the multitude of controls to be performed to meet the standards imposed by the US Food and Drug Administration.

The direct consequence, therefore, could be that fewer companies will go into studying psilocybin, which will limit the research. However, in January 2015, Compass Pathways was able to produce 250 grams of psilocybin¬†from scratch, which still represent a world’s premiere.

They recreated the molecule ex-nihilo, without extracting it from the mushrooms, which lightened the process of artificial psilocybin production for therapeutic use and medication development.

There are no data on what prices they sold the artificially-created psilocybin to the researchers but, accordingly, now that they have managed to make such quantities, prices should fall.

Drugs research is on the rise, worldwide

The only good news for the researchers of psilocybin is that the demand for studying on drugs is growing and sponsors will definitely be found.

Psilocybin, for example, would have a healing effect on depression and that’s exactly why the scientists from Compass Pathways have struggled to produce synthetic psilocybin – to study the compound and to ease up the production of new medications to combat depression and other similar disorders.

Matthew Johnson hopes that “as in any other economic product, the volume will have an effect on the price,” thus, the more psilocybin created, the lower the prices for studying this unique drug found in some species of mushrooms.

Erin VanDyke lives on her family farm and has more than 35 years of hands-on experience with the use of livestock guard dogs for predator control. On their farm, Jan and her family use corgis as herding dogs and have raised Shetland sheep, Fainting goats, Morgan and Trakehner horses, and historic breeds of chickens and turkeys. Erin is also an active beekeeper.


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