A Baby Might Get Born with Birth Defects if the Mother has the Zika Virus

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The Zika virus is a virus that is mostly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. There have been some researchers about this, but a new one was conducted recently, and this time it focused on the way the virus affects mothers and their babies.

The study appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine and it shows what are the risks for a pregnant woman who get the virus. The study focuses directly on the ones who become ill from the virus.

The researchers revealed that if a woman is pregnant and she becomes ill because of the Zika virus, then there is a 7 percent chance that here newborn will have a birth defect. The risk goes even higher if the mother becomes ill during the first trimester, and the child will have risk that is almost 13 higher.

“Other studies showed earlier that the risk of births defects did not depend on the presence or the severity of (Zika)-related symptoms,” chief author Dr. Bruno Hoen of the University Medical Center of Guadeloupe explained. It also appears that the risk is different for mothers who already had Zika infection. In the places where the virus is new, the fetus might be even more vulnerable.

The development

The study also aims to analyze the long-term effects. They will continue to analyze the 527 babies that survived, and they will see how they evolve in the next two years. This is a great way to see what are the real effects of the Zika virus.

The most common birth defect that is linked with the Zika virus is microcephaly when the baby is born with a head that is why too small. This birth defect was particular noticed back in 2016-2017 during an outbreak.

Erin VanDyke lives on her family farm and has more than 35 years of hands-on experience with the use of livestock guard dogs for predator control. On their farm, Jan and her family use corgis as herding dogs and have raised Shetland sheep, Fainting goats, Morgan and Trakehner horses, and historic breeds of chickens and turkeys. Erin is also an active beekeeper.


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